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The page below is a sample from the LabCE course HIV Safety for Florida Clinical Laboratory Personnel. Access the complete course and earn ASCLS P.A.C.E.-approved continuing education credits by subscribing online.

Learn more about HIV Safety for Florida Clinical Laboratory Personnel (online CE course) »

Occupational Exposures

HIV transmission, due to occupational exposure, occurs by:

  • Percutaneous injury, such as a needlestick or a cut with a sharp object;
  • Contact of mucous membrane or nonintact skin with HIV-infected blood or body fluids. Exposed skin that is nonintact includes skin that is chapped, abraded, or afflicted with dermatitis.
The risk of HIV transmission after a percutaneous exposure to HIV-infected blood is 0.3%.
The risk of HIV transmission after a mucous membrane exposure to HIV-infected blood is 0.09%.
The risk of HIV transmission after contact of abraded skin with HIV-infected blood is estimated to be less than 0.09%.